EASTERN PROMISES
2007, Focus Features, 100 min, UK/Canada/USA, Dir: David Cronenberg

Among David Cronenberg’s most accomplished films, this thriller about the Russian mob stars Viggo Mortenson and Naomi Watts. On a rainy night in London, a pregnant Russian teenager arrives in a hospital badly wounded; only her baby can be saved, and Anna (Watts) sets out to locate the mother’s family. What she finds is a web of crime and deception - and a bizarre relationship with enigmatic mob driver Nikolai (Mortenson). Featuring one of the most memorable fight scenes in recent cinematic history, EASTERN PROMISES will keep viewers guessing until the very end.


WANDA
1970, Janus Films, 103 min, USA, Dir: Barbara Loden

Writer-director Barbara Loden’s sole feature is a groundbreaking work of American independent cinema, bringing to life a kind of character seldom seen onscreen. Set amid a soot-choked Pennsylvania landscape, and shot in an intensely intimate vérité style, the film takes up with distant and soft-spoken Wanda (Loden), who has left her husband, lost custody of her children and now finds herself alone. Drifting between dingy bars and motels, she is callously mistreated by a series of men - including a bank robber who ropes her into his next criminal scheme. A rarely seen masterpiece that has nonetheless exerted an influence on generations of artists and filmmakers, WANDA is a compassionate and wrenching portrait of a woman stranded on society’s margins. “One of the best American independent films ever made." - Richard Brody, The New Yorker


GET CARTER
1971, Warner Bros., 112 min, UK, Dir: Mike Hodges

Michael Caine stars as Jack Carter, a tough, ruthless London mob enforcer. His only sentiment is for his timid brother, Frank, who works as a bartender in Newcastle and makes a point of staying out of trouble. When his brother dies in an accident, Carter goes to the funeral hoping to make amends for past mistakes by reconnecting with what's left of his family. After learning that his brother was murdered, Jack metes out his own brutal brand of justice - but the closer he gets to his goal, the more he questions his actions. With Britt Ekland.


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