THE SQUARE (2017)
2017, Magnolia Pictures, 142 min, Sweden/Germany/France/Denmark, Dir: Ruben Östlund

In the latest from writer-director Ruben Östlund (FORCE MAJEURE), Claes Bang stars as Christian, the respected curator of a contemporary art museum, a divorced but devoted father of two who drives an electric car and supports good causes. His next show is “The Square,” an installation which invites passersby to altruism, reminding them of their role as responsible fellow human beings. But sometimes it is difficult to live up to your own ideals, and Christian’s foolish response to the theft of his phone drags him into shameful situations. Meanwhile, the museum's PR agency has created an unexpected campaign for ”The Square”; the response is overblown and sends Christian, as well as the museum, into an existential crisis. Costarring Elisabeth Moss and Dominic West, this droll satire won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival.


PEE WEE’S BIG ADVENTURE
1985, Warner Bros., 90 min, USA, Dir: Tim Burton

The Eighties were precarious. If you weren’t careful you could be forced to feel sorry for the yuppie ratsticks in WALL STREET or find yourself actually rooting for egomaniacal Jerry Lewis to free himself in KING OF COMEDY. But the decade triumphantly launched PEE WEE’S BIG ADVENTURE, the movie that lionizes the 90lb weakling and propelled Tim Burton and Danny Elfman into the goth cinematic darkosphere. Part-caper, part-road movie PEE WEE is an homage inside a tour-de-france with every kitsch genre mined to full potential. The story of a lovable weirdling (Paul Reubens) who lives alone with just his beloved bicycle. When the bike gets stolen Pee Dub rightly suspects his bratty neighbor Francis (Mark Holton), but Francis has paid a thug to ditch the bike and the chase is on all the way to the basement of the Alamo. Drunken bikers, a ghostly lady trucker and Godzilla all show up with madcap consequences. EIGHTIES WARNING: this movie contains James Brolin being ironically hilarious. No one will be seated during Twisted Sister.


KISS KISS, BANG BANG
2005, Warner Bros., 103 min, USA, Dir: Shane Black

In this a breezy take on writer-director Shane Black's trademark buddy action/comedy oeuvre, a petty thief (Robert Downey Jr.) is brought to Los Angeles for an unlikely audition and finds himself in the middle of a murder investigation, along with his high school dream girl (Michelle Monaghan) and a detective (Val Kilmer) who has been training him for his upcoming role.


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