PEE WEE’S BIG ADVENTURE
1985, Warner Bros., 90 min, USA, Dir: Tim Burton

The Eighties were precarious. If you weren’t careful you could be forced to feel sorry for the yuppie ratsticks in WALL STREET or find yourself actually rooting for egomaniacal Jerry Lewis to free himself in KING OF COMEDY. But the decade triumphantly launched PEE WEE’S BIG ADVENTURE, the movie that lionizes the 90lb weakling and propelled Tim Burton and Danny Elfman into the goth cinematic darkosphere. Part-caper, part-road movie PEE WEE is an homage inside a tour-de-france with every kitsch genre mined to full potential. The story of a lovable weirdling (Paul Reubens) who lives alone with just his beloved bicycle. When the bike gets stolen Pee Dub rightly suspects his bratty neighbor Francis (Mark Holton), but Francis has paid a thug to ditch the bike and the chase is on all the way to the basement of the Alamo. Drunken bikers, a ghostly lady trucker and Godzilla all show up with madcap consequences. EIGHTIES WARNING: this movie contains James Brolin being ironically hilarious. No one will be seated during Twisted Sister.


THE LOST CITY OF Z
2016, Amazon Studios, 141 min, Dir: James Gray

Based on author David Grann’s nonfiction bestseller, this is the incredible true story of British explorer Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam), who journeys into the Amazon at the dawn of the 20th century and discovers evidence of a previously unknown civilization that may have once inhabited the region. Despite ridicule from the scientific establishment, the determined Fawcett - supported by his devoted wife (Sienna Miller), son (Tom Holland) and aide-de-camp (Robert Pattinson) - returns time and again to his beloved jungle in an attempt to prove his case, culminating in his mysterious disappearance in 1925. A stirring tribute to the exploratory spirit and a conflicted adventurer driven to the verge of obsession.


THE SEA WOLF
1941, Warner Bros.,, 100 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

The definitive cinematic version of Jack London’s famed novel returns to the big screen. Edward G. Robinson’s magnificent portrayal of Wolf Larsen is the centerpiece of a darkly fatalistic tale adapted by Robert Rossen (ALL THE KING’S MEN, THE HUSTLER) who blends a distinctive anti-Nazi sentiment (initiated into American movies by the brothers Warner) with an unforgettable saga of tyranny at sea. An all-star cast of John Garfield, Ida Lupino, Gene Lockhart and Barry Fitzgerald add dramatic heft to Curtiz’s brilliantly helmed epic.


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