BIG FISH
2003, Sony Pictures, 120 min, Dir: Tim Burton

In the heartwarming BIG FISH, director Tim Burton brings his inimitable imagination on a journey that delves deep into a fabled relationship between a father and his son. Edward Bloom (Albert Finney) has always been a teller of tall-tales about his oversized life as a young man (Ewan McGregor), when his wanderlust led him on an unlikely journey from a small-town in Alabama, around the world, and back again. His mythic exploits dart from the delightful to the delirious as he weaves epic tales about giants, blizzards, a witch and conjoined-twin lounge singers. With his larger-than-life stories, Bloom charms almost everyone he encounters except for his estranged son Will (Billy Crudup). When his mother Sandra (Jessica Lange) tries to reunite them, Will must learn how to separate fact from fiction as he comes to terms with his father's great feats and great failings.


TOM JONES
1963, Janus Films, 128 min, Dir: Tony Richardson

At the height of the British New Wave in the early 1960s, director Tony Richardson and playwright John Osborne set out for more fanciful territory than the gritty realism of the movement they’d helped establish. TOM JONES brings a theatrical flair to Henry Fielding’s canonical eighteenth-century novel, boisterously chronicling the misadventures of the foundling of the title (Albert Finney, in a career-defining performance), whose easy charm seems to lead him astray at every turn from his beloved, the wellborn Sophie Western (Susannah York). This spirited picaresque, evocatively shot in England’s rambling countryside and featuring an extraordinary ensemble cast, went on to become a worldwide sensation, winning the Oscar for best picture on the way to securing its status as a classic of irreverent wit and playful cinematic expression.


RATATOUILLE
2007, Walt Disney Pictures, 111 min, USA, Dir: Brad Bird, Jan Pinkava

This Oscar winner for Best Animated Feature follows Remy (voiced by Patton Oswalt), a rodent who dreams of becoming a top chef. Remy gets his chance by teaming up with a garbage boy at famed Paris restaurant Gusteau's, but he must be careful – rats are killed if caught in the kitchen. A voice cast including Ian Holm, Janeane Garofalo, Brian Dennehy and Peter O'Toole serves up a banquet of delicious performances. “A nearly flawless piece of popular art, as well as one of the most persuasive portraits of an artist ever committed to film.” - A.O. Scott, The New York Times.


Syndicate content